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Are there any other alternatives other than the HP kit? I have seen 300ZX TT brakes on a P10, but it looks a little hard. How would you trim 3mm off the diameter of a rotor? Will the G20 brake lines work with 300ZX TT calipers? Lastly, will the stock master cylinder be large enough or would I need one from say a Altima? Any help is greatly appreciated. If anyone has done any brake modifications let me know.
 

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I think the rotors would have to be trimmed down on a lathe at a metal working shop. You would have to get a custom brakeline kit developed for the 300zxtt breaks as they are 4 piston and ours are 2. That also applies to the master cylinder, you'd need to get a master cylinder for 4 piston breaks.

I would like to do the same upgrade but it just doesn't seem like it's worth all the trouble. I just wish Brembo made break calipers for a p10.
 

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BritCG20 said:
I think the rotors would have to be trimmed down on a lathe at a metal working shop. You would have to get a custom brakeline kit developed for the 300zxtt breaks as they are 4 piston and ours are 2. That also applies to the master cylinder, you'd need to get a master cylinder for 4 piston breaks.
Brake lines and MC's don't really care if you have 2, 4 or 30 piston calipers. You might be better off with an Altima MC because it moves more fluid than the stock one. Typically larger, and ones with more pistons, calipers need more fluid because of the extra piston area.

You'll still need custom made brake lines like BritG20 said not because the 300zx clalipers have 2 more pistons but because the 300zx uses a banjo fitting and the G20 uses a flare nut. (or vise versa can remember off the top if my head)

Check this out for more details.
http://www.conecrazy.com/project-g20/brakes.html
 

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Also, the rotors have to be redrilled to accept the 4 lug pattern, and shaved EVERY time you replace the rotors. And, you may have wheel fitment issues as the new calipers will stick out quite a bit further than the factory G20 calipers.
Not trying to rain on the parade, just letting you know what's necessary, before getting started.

Are you guys having stopping issues? I havn't had any with my setup so far, even on the track it seems to be enough for the car right now. I have motul fluid, metal master pads in the front, Nissan in the rear, and stock rotors, calipers, and lines.
 

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i have crossed drilled rotars

they are much better than stock!! dont let anyone tell u they arnt
 

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NismoG20 said:
i have crossed drilled rotars

they are much better than stock!! dont let anyone tell u they arnt

:monkey:

Cross drilled rotors are not better than stock.


I'm willing to bet your cross drilled rotors will last less time than stock. They also dont offer any more braking power.


Cross drilling is beneficial to high performance racing brakes where the holes let more air pass through for additional cooling. Your street brakes will never get hot enough where this may make or break you (no pun intended).

Cross drilling also makes your rotors crack. Race cars change thier brakes frequently so they do not have to worry about this.


The best cooling option is slotted rotors.

The best braking option is larger rotors, calipers, pads.
 

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NismoG20 said:
i have crossed drilled rotars

they are much better than stock!! dont let anyone tell u they arnt
Did you by any chance change out your brake pads and bleed the brakes at the same time? If so, I'd bet money that's where the increase in stopping power came from, unless your old rotors were somehow trashed, which is very difficult to do.
 

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NismoG20 said:
i have crossed drilled rotars

they are much better than stock!! dont let anyone tell u they arnt
yeah, i have the powerstop crossdrilled rotors in front. personally i think they were a waste of my money. i see no improvement over stock.
 

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Good to know about the powerstop rotors. I was wondering about that. But is that only on the street or is it the same on the track as well? Cause if there's a significant differance in stopping power at the track I might still get some.
 

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brakes and cooling

You may want to think about different wheels to give better cooling OR cooling ducts like on many performance cars like a Porsche Turbo 911 to bring extra cooling BEFORE you do the cross drilled thing... My experience with cross drilled rotors is that they tend to get stress fractures easier AND they cannot be turned so you have to replace them when you replace the pads..... NOT very cost effective... ..and they tend to warp easier.. and of course wear out faster as already stated here...
 

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As stated by Justin, fitment issues are a serious issue.. with most upgrede options, most of all the 300Z brakes.

Also as stated, turning down (4mm over all of the diameter) of the rotor AND redrilling to 4 bolt pattern is required each time the front rotors are to be replaced (with the 300Z brakes on a G20).

I have researched his thoroughly.. I had two sets of 300Z calipers in here in my garage for test fitting, a TT set and a NA set. The TT set is 4mm thicker than the NA 300Z caliper.

Even with the NA caliper, my wheels would still need a spacer to fit (and that's with aftermarket wheels, that don't have spokes that come into the wheel much).

Also, a correction to a few that posted.. the stock brakes are single piston, the 300Z units are four pistion, two on each side of the caliper.

Now, as also stated, the issue with brakes is heat! Heat is your enemy. So, there are a few things I would suggest you can do to assist with your braking woh's..

First, put on a bad with a good bite! That helps alot. I personally feel that stock pads have a pretty good bite, and they are predictable when they start to go away.

Second, Add good fluid! Motul all the way!! I run Motul in both my performance cars and it kicks ass! I have yet to boil my fluid even on track.

Third, get steel braided brake lines.. the assist with brake feel!
So if your brakes start to fade, or to do things, you'll have a better idea of what they're doing.

Fourth, cooling.. you can duct your brakes as stated by someone else.

Fifth, make sure you're running good tires.. if you're running tires that are less than sticky, you're going to be sliding around.. the brakes will work well and the tires will just slide (hence, you'll be sliding).


Now with all that I have said above, if you are considering going to the track.. get hawk blues!! That will help more than you can imagine.. They hook up!

Any questions on what I've said, let me know.
 
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