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Is it possible to change a caliper and not have to bleed the system? Not only do I not have the time to bleed the calipers but I am also afraid of opening the bleeders on my front calipers because they look rusty as hell and will probably snap on me. I need to replace the rear calipers because one is sticking and the other one looks like it might do the same thing soon.

A couple of suggestions was to wrap duct tape around the teeth of a vice grip and clamp the brake line shut to keep air from getting into the system while quickly swapping over the line to the new caliper. Has anyone ever heard or that working? Someone else added that once the line is connected to the new caliper, open the bleeder screw and have someone pump the pedal to the floor, release the vise grip and tighten the bleeder once the fluids runs out.

Worse case senario I will have to end up bleeding the whole system but I would rather not have to replace the front calipers because of a broken bleeder.
 

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A couple of suggestions was to wrap duct tape around the teeth of a vice grip and clamp the brake line shut to keep air from getting into the system while quickly swapping over the line to the new caliper. Has anyone ever heard or that working?
Yes, it will work. However, you will notice a very soft, spongy brake pedal and very poor stopping power after the repair due to the air you have introduced to the brake system. However, you do not need to bleed the whole system out when replacing one caliper so long as you use some form of pinch clamp to keep the fluid from running out of the master cylinder via the open brake hose. If you still have fluid in your master cylinder after you've finished changing the caliper, you just need to bleed that one caliper.
 

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maybe just that brake caliper your replacing.....the "new"caliper will have no oil in it so there fore you need to bleed "air"air out
 

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had this done once. the clamp prevents spilling and introducing air into the system but as everyone says, you will have to bleed the new caliper. it will work...
 

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clamp the line, then attach a hose and syringe to the new caliper bleeder. After installation pull up on the syringe with the beeder open and release the clamp. In theory you should be able to pull the air out of the new caliper and pull the brake fluid into the caliper.

I never tried this but always thought about it and in my mind it works.
 

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All bs above.
Before you start push the pedal down to where you feel good pressure and block it there with a stick/board/extension/whatever, that blocks off the ports in the master cylinder and won't allow any fluid from leaving the reservoir. Change out the offending caliper completely, take the pedal block off, top off the reservoir, open that bleeder and watch for the solid stream of fluid to happen. Make sure you don't let the reservoir run empty and refill to the proper level. Put the master cylinder cover back on, pump the pedal up to seat the caliper piston and recheck the fill level. End.
 

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Loren knows all! Get on chat got something to tell you.
 

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you pump up the pressure, hold it in place then disconnect the caliper huh? i'd like to see that.
 

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"Change out the offending caliper completely, take the pedal block off, top off the reservoir, open that bleeder and watch for the solid stream of fluid to happen." The fluid will just drain out through the bleeder without any pressure?
 

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Discussion Starter #15
All bs above.
Before you start push the pedal down to where you feel good pressure and block it there with a stick/board/extension/whatever, that blocks off the ports in the master cylinder and won't allow any fluid from leaving the reservoir. Change out the offending caliper completely, take the pedal block off, top off the reservoir, open that bleeder and watch for the solid stream of fluid to happen. Make sure you don't let the reservoir run empty and refill to the proper level. Put the master cylinder cover back on, pump the pedal up to seat the caliper piston and recheck the fill level. End.
HAHA you said the same thing Coheed said on the dash. Sounds like a plan. I have no issues bleeding the new calipers, I'm just trying to have to bleed the front ones due to the rusty bleeders.

Don't clamp the lines. Throw a phone book onto the brake pedal before you disconnect the line. When you unbolt the hose you will have a little bit of fluid come out, but it won't keep dripping as long as the brake pedal is slightly applied.

Once you have the old one off. Hook up the new one and open the bleeder. Then bring the brake pedal back up to the very top. This will allow fluid to flow into the caliper. Give it ten minutes or so and keep the brake reservoir filled up with fluid. When you get a good steady flow of brake fluid out of the bleeder, lock it down.

Done.

This is gravity bleeding. No pumping required. Maybe it will save you some time.
 

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Hey all:cheeky:, I posted the "YOUTUBE" 3 part rear rotor replacement video because the mechanic and instructor uses this pinch method everyone here is referencing. If you've watch the video's the mechanic uses a set of needle nose grip pliers with rubber hose on the tips to keep from damaging the brake lines. This seems to be a short cut method even for the mechanic pros. As I came across a few DIY brakes service video instructed by so-called professional mechanics who reference or used this pinch the brake line method. I plan on changing my rotors soon and had been sourcing the net for video how to's when I came across this video. Personally , I say it's a little risky as you could permanently damage your brakes lines as a novice.

My concern over a professional mechanic doing this is, Have you ever had one of those domino repair experiences? I'll explain. A mechanic fixes one thing and shortly there after..something else related to that part goes? Hmmmm and your saying: DAMN! how did this happen i.e. I just had a brake job , pads rotors, and calipers. Now alllllll of the sudden SH*T. I need a brake lines too? If the pro's are pinching brake lines to save time you gotta wonder.
 

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Hey all:cheeky:, I posted the "YOUTUBE" 3 part rear rotor replacement video because the mechanic and instructor uses this pinch method everyone here is referencing. If you've watch the video's the mechanic uses a set of needle nose grip pliers with rubber hose on the tips to keep from damaging the brake lines. This seems to be a short cut method even for the mechanic pros. As I came across a few DIY brakes service video instructed by so-called professional mechanics who reference or used this pinch the brake line method. I plan on changing my rotors soon and had been sourcing the net for video how to's when I came across this video. Personally , I say it's a little risky as you could permanently damage your brakes lines as a novice.

My concern over a professional mechanic doing this is, Have you ever had one of those domino repair experiences? I'll explain. A mechanic fixes one thing and shortly there after..something else related to that part goes? Hmmmm and your saying: DAMN! how did this happen i.e. I just had a brake job , pads rotors, and calipers. Now alllllll of the sudden SH*T. I need a brake lines too? If the pro's are pinching brake lines to save time you gotta wonder.
The thing you should realize is that mechanics are guys that get paid for doing what they do. Just that. They aren't a God or the Pope's brother. They aren't any different than anyone else in that some want to do high quality work, some don't. Period.
The certification of mechanics only means they know enough to pass the certification, not that they're going to do everything right, or even better than none certified people.
Pinching the lines is a short-cut, nothing more. Yes, there are special tools made for it, as there are for doing other things that aren't in the best interest for your wallet, or car. There are also pedal posts that hold the pedal where you want.
 

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I do realize and I can't agree more DMSentra, Thanx for the feedback.:cheeky:





The thing you should realize is that mechanics are guys that get paid for doing what they do. Just that. They aren't a God or the Pope's brother. They aren't any different than anyone else in that some want to do high quality work, some don't. Period.
The certification of mechanics only means they know enough to pass the certification, not that they're going to do everything right, or even better than none certified people.
Pinching the lines is a short-cut, nothing more. Yes, there are special tools made for it, as there are for doing other things that aren't in the best interest for your wallet, or car. There are also pedal posts that hold the pedal where you want.
 

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Pinching the lines is a short-cut, nothing more. Yes, there are special tools made for it, as there are for doing other things that aren't in the best interest for your wallet, or car. There are also pedal posts that hold the pedal where you want.
I have one of these brake hose pinching "special" tools (not all that special, really). I use it often, and not just on brakes. As a professional mechanic I can tell you that I've never witnessed or heard of a brake hose pinching tool causing a brake hose failure when used properly. Now that's not to say that everyone knows what they're doing (as you had also stated). As I stated in a different post: Incompetent owner and incompetent mechanic both lead to the same results.
 
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