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Discussion Starter #1 (Edited)
My power steering really needs a flush, but I cannot find any directions in the service manual, only bleeding instructions. I sucked out as much as I could from the reservoir and filed it with new fluid but that is not nearly enough.

There are two hoses going to the reservoir. One probably goes from the reservoir and one to the reservoir. So would disconnecting the hoses and immersing the intake hose in new fluid and doing the bleed procedure until clean fluid comes from the other hose?

If that sounds right, anybody know which hose is witch and if there is anything I should watch out for when removing the reservoir and hoses.

And finally, how much ATF does the entire PS system hold?

Thanks
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If your PS fluid was contaminated or very dirty it might cause the pump seal or steering rack seals to fail.
Unless you replace a ps hose or steering rack most people never flush their ps fluid. PS uses auto tranny fluid (dexron) and really doesn't need to be flushed unless you know it has been contaminated. Brake fluid gets contaminated by water (humidity) over time - not PS fluid. PS fluid if not low or contaminated could easily last 200K. Draining the reservoir and replacing that much of the fluid wouldn't hurt, but is mostly a peace of mind issue.
 

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Discussion Starter #6 (Edited)
merlin said:
I suck the fluid out, pour in new fluid.

Start the car, turn wheel left and right 10 times or so
Turn car off
suck fluid out, pour in new fluid

Repeat about 3 times or so until the fluid comes out clean!
I actually did it exactly 3 times. There is some plastic split inside the reservoir so only 2/3's can be sucked out. The fluid is just as dirty as when I started. So I decided to go for a full flush.

Am I right about the two hoses? If so, then it may flushable like the transmission only from the reservoir hoses.
I do need to know how much fluid the system takes as if I do start flushing, I need to keep going until clean fluid comes out and I need to buy enough.

My fluid is nice and brown, and is very distinctive from the new pink fluid I add to the reservoir. But after a few turns, it is back to brown.

Thanks again.
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Capacity is about 1 qt. Buy two or three and you will be safe.

You can definitely flush using the return hose to the reservoir – it is the one coming in the side. I believe the bottom hose feeds the pump.

Disconnect the reservoir return hose and use a barbed hose coupler and a long piece of hose to drain into a catch can / jug. If you have a helper it would be easy to start and run the car while you add fluid to the reservoir and the pump sends first old fluid then new into your catch can. When it looks clear you’re done. I don’t know how fast it will pump out, but if you’re lucky you won’t even have to bleed the system if the reservoir never runs dry.

This is just like flushing an automatic transmission without a machine.

Truth is your brown fluid isn’t hurting anything, but I know you want some clear red stuff before you’ll be satisfied so have some fun. The ladies really love it when your PS fluid is clean. :p
 

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Discussion Starter #8 (Edited)
davemac said:
Capacity is about 1 qt. Buy two or three and you will be safe.

You can definitely flush using the return hose to the reservoir ? it is the one coming in the side. I believe the bottom hose feeds the pump.

Disconnect the reservoir return hose and use a barbed hose coupler and a long piece of hose to drain into a catch can / jug. If you have a helper it would be easy to start and run the car while you add fluid to the reservoir and the pump sends first old fluid then new into your catch can. When it looks clear you?re done. I don?t know how fast it will pump out, but if you?re lucky you won?t even have to bleed the system if the reservoir never runs dry.

This is just like flushing an automatic transmission without a machine.

Truth is your brown fluid isn?t hurting anything, but I know you want some clear red stuff before you?ll be satisfied so have some fun. The ladies really love it when your PS fluid is clean. :p
My steering is a little rough, meaning that when I turn the wheel shakes and fights a little, and on smooth roads. Which is why I want to flush so much. Steering shake is cause by bad power steering fluid, right?

I put in 1/2 quart in it and the color has not changed at all so I thought it would be a-lot more.
The steering is much smoother now, but I do want it nice and pink just to be sure.

Will try it tonight or tomorrow night and if all goes well, maybe I can do a writeup.
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Actually the problem you describe is more often due to:

A power steering pump that is failing.
A loose belt, or a slipping belt (old, or oil contaminated).
Air in the system.

Of course putting in new fluid is certainly not going to hurt anything, and is a good idea. However, it may not solve your problem.
 

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Discussion Starter #10 (Edited)
Well, I tried the flush and failed miserably. I could loosen the screws holding the tubes from the PS reservoir, but they were on tight and I did not have nearly enough room to loosen them or even get a good grip on them.

I tried pulling out the reservoir attached, but it was stuck on the strut tower mount. I did not see anything actually holding it but I could not pull it out.

Anybody have any suggestions on how to remove the reservoir, and/or how to remove attached tubes easily and without much of a mess.

Thanks
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elkinm said:
Well, I tried the flush and failed miserably. I could loosen the screws holding the tubes from the PS reservoir, but they were on tight and I did not have nearly enough room to loosen them or even get a good grip on them.

I tried pulling out the reservoir attached, but it was stuck on the strut tower mount. I did not see anything actually holding it but I could not pull it out.

Anybody have any suggestions on how to remove the reservoir, and/or how to remove attached tubes easily and without much of a mess.

Thanks
Order a set of 'hose pliers' from Harbor Freight Tools. http://www.harborfreight.com/cpi/ctaf/displayitem.taf?Itemnumber=37909 They will come in handy every time you need to pull a hose........
 

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elkinm said:
Well, I tried the flush and failed miserably. I could loosen the screws holding the tubes from the PS reservoir, but they were on tight and I did not have nearly enough room to loosen them or even get a good grip on them.

I tried pulling out the reservoir attached, but it was stuck on the strut tower mount. I did not see anything actually holding it but I could not pull it out.

Anybody have any suggestions on how to remove the reservoir, and/or how to remove attached tubes easily and without much of a mess.

Thanks
I did PS flush myself on my wife's G recently and took me like 30 mins to do it. Here's how did: JACK UP CAR'S FRONT. 1. Suck out fluid from the reservoir using turkey baster or such. To get more fluid out, you may wish to take the plastic filter out. 2. Disconnect the return line - hose at the side (not the bottom end) of the reservoir. The hose is tight but pushed a little bit down using a flat screw driver to loosen up...don't use a sharp one though. Need some rags up there to catch some fluid drips. 3. Cap the reservoir tube tight to prevent fluid from coming out when you try to refill it. For the hose, extend it using a 2 feet clear hose, plug the other end into a clear soda bottle and secure it somewhere near the reservoir. 4. When everything is secured, go crank the engine for 1-2 secs. and the return line(hose) will spit like a quart or less fluid. Try to find a position where you can see through your soda bottle while cranking. If you can't, just don't crank it way too long, 1-2 secs is enough. 5. go get rid of the dity/old fluid. I used an empty 1 gal. milk bottle to collect my old fluid. Half full when i was done with the process. 6. Now refill the reservoir with clean fluid. Go turn your steering wheel left and right 5-6 times. Give at least 2 secs. delay for each turn. When turning the steering wheel, the return line will spit some more fluid. Make sure your reservoir will not go dry to the point the system is sucking air. Top off with fresh fluid as necessary. repeat step #4 to #6 until you get a fresh looking fluid coming out from the return line. 7. Reconnect return line(hose) to the reservoir tube.

8. Top off fluid. Start car. Turn steering wheel left/right 5-6 times while checking fluid for air bubbles. Repeat 8 as necessary while car is running.

Put the car down. clean up. Done. Check for proper fluid level!

Used up 3 quarts of Mobil 1 Dexron/Mercon for the the job.
 

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just disconnect the high pressure power steering hose from the bottom of the engine, this causes pretty much everything to come out, gets very messy too. I believe it is a 24mm bolt FYI
 

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Discussion Starter #16 (Edited)
Finally flushed. The return hose is the one going to the front of the car and tightly on with a metal tube so I could not disconnect it.

I emptied the reservoir and removed the feed hose. The hose pliers were a major help here. Then I used a funnel to feed new fluid strait to the hose. And suck out fluid from the reservoir when needed. It put in 3 quarts. And the fluid was mighty clean at least at first.
After a short time it go a little darker, but still reddish pinkish and the reservoir looks pink under a light source. Maybe I will do one more flush later to get it really clean.

Steering is generally smoother, I do have an issue. If I rotate the wheel 90 degrees to either direction, or 450 degrees (full turn beyond 90), the wheel shakes a little.
It is somewhat slow inconsistent vibration, and it happens at very low speeds more noticeably then ant higher speeds.
It feels a little concerning as it feels a little like the steering linkage or the wheel or something is loose and shaking. Any ideas or possible causes, especially with the orientation of the wheel?
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saw this unanswered question during a search. answer is most likely air in the rack. I had the same thing on my mustang after changing racks and bleeding it and it went away after a week. just keep an eye on your fluid level
 

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4. When everything is secured, go crank the engine for 1-2 secs. and the return line(hose) will spit like a quart or less fluid. Try to find a position where you can see through your soda bottle while cranking. If you can't, just don't crank it way too long, 1-2 secs is enough. 5. go get rid of the dity/old fluid. I used an empty 1 gal. milk bottle to collect my old fluid. Half full when i was done with the process. 6. Now refill the reservoir with clean fluid. Go turn your steering wheel left and right 5-6 times. Give at least 2 secs. delay for each turn. When turning the steering wheel, the return line will spit some more fluid. Make sure your reservoir will not go dry to the point the system is sucking air. Top off with fresh fluid as necessary. repeat step #4 to #6 until you get a fresh looking fluid coming out from the return line. 7. Reconnect return line(hose) to the reservoir tube.

8. Top off fluid. Start car. Turn steering wheel left/right 5-6 times while checking fluid for air bubbles. Repeat 8 as necessary while car is running.
Great instructions!
  • Is it absolutely necessary to rotate the steering wheel while flushing and cycling in the fresh ATF?
  • If it IS a necessary step, what is the purpose behind rotating the wheel while cycling in the new fluid with the engine running?
  • What is the effect/ result if the steering wheel is not rotated while cycling in the new fluid?
 

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And HERE is one that DOES !! Go to minute 6:02. How a Hydraulic Steering Rack Works
It looks like the fluid only enters the cylinder of the rack when/ if the steering wheel not in a neutral position, (when turning Left or Right).
The fluid enters and fills up the Input Shaft to be directed one way or the other into the rack's cylinder. But, if the steering wheel is NOT turned one way or the other, then the fluid simply exits the Input Shaft, runs through the Control Valve Body and then exits via the Return Line, and returns to the Reservoir.
 
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