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My sister's 2000 G20 CEL was on-the code was for the knock sensor. I replaced a knock sensor on a highport in the past, so I figured I could do this one as well. I forgot how arduous the task is.

Things you will need:

Jack and jack stands
12mm wrench/ratcheting wrench
14mm wrench
2ft ratchet extension
Hammer or mallet
Small tip flathead screwdriver or pick
10mm socket
14mm socket
17mm socket
various length extensions
1/4in, 3/8in, 1/2 drive ratchets
block of wood
plenty of time and PATIENCE

I removed the crossmember and rear transmission mount brace so I could work with both hands (it is useful at times). A jack and block or wood are used to support the weight under the transmission side, as close to center as possible.

The 10mm socket is for a bolt on the brace holding a plug. There are three 14mm bolts connecting the brace to the transmission along with one 17mm bolt. The motor mount bolts are 14mm and the front mount has an unattached nut, so you'll need a ratchet on one side and a wrench on the other. The crossmember bolts are also 17mm. Loosen the mount bolts first then the crossmember bolts. You can leave the bolts in the mounts then pull them out and drop the crossmember, which is not heavy.

Here is the only picture I have of the crossmember and brace removed:


On to the fun part. I didn't decide to do a write-up until I was on the reinstalling end of the job. Sorry. But there is a mod at the end, so keep reading.

I braced a long extension against the 12mm wrench that I finally manged to hook around the bolt holding the sensor on then tapped the end of the extension to break the bolt loose. There is very little room to get your hand up there, let alone your hand holding a wrench and by my guesstimation around 60 degrees of space to turn a wrench. Plus a ratchet and socket won't fit. So to avoid having to turn and reposition your box end wrench or open end wrench, I suggest a ratching wrench.

Here is a pic of the bolt hole after the sensor had been removed:

Please excuse the poor drawing quality.

Be careful not to drop the bolt once you've removed it; it may be difficult to locate just like my 12mm wrench that is now wedged somewhere between the block and the starter or something.

There is a clip holding the sensor in the plug. Pry it out with a screwdriver or pick and be careful not to lose this as well.

Remove old sensor and replace with new one, then replace clip. It is also good practice to check the wires and connection of the sensor while it's removed. Also clean the mating surface of both the block and the sensor.

The bolt is difficult to line up with the hole while in the sensor and almost impossible to insert through the sensor while it is being held in place with your other hand, so I came up with this somewhat easier solution:

It is slightly longer than the original bolt, but works fine. It was either this one or one that was 1/3 of the length.

I used a bit of thread lock on the end that was to be threaded into the block. I was able to thread it completely into the block with my thumb and index finger:


Next, slide new sensor over the bolt:


Hand thread the nut onto the bolt til snug then tighten down with your wrench:


Once you've made it this far pat yourself on the back and take a break.

I took this opportunity to clean the years of muck and power steering fluid from the crossmemeber:


Unfortunately I had not ordered prothane replacement mounts yet.

Hopefully I did not leave anything out. Thanks for viewing.
 

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A big thank you for posting this "how to." Had a recent scare when I had a knock sensor fault code. Looked like a real pain in the rump to replace. Fortunately, it then started throwing both MAP and knock sensor codes. Another forum member advised me that it's normal to get a false knock sensor code when a different fault is also displayed. It was the MAP, a simple replacement.

Any how, I copied your knock sensor replacement post to my G20 file, just in case I get a real knock code. Again, thanks!!! :bowdown:
 

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Discussion Starter #3
A big thank you for posting this "how to." Had a recent scare when I had a knock sensor fault code. Looked like a real pain in the rump to replace. Fortunately, it then started throwing both MAP and knock sensor codes. Another forum member advised me that it's normal to get a false knock sensor code when a different fault is also displayed. It was the MAP, a simple replacement.

Any how, I copied your knock sensor replacement post to my G20 file, just in case I get a real knock code. Again, thanks!!! :bowdown:
No problem. It's my first "how to" and I feel it's a bit vague or not well written compared to other how to's on here, but practice makes perfect. Thanks again; I hope you don't have to refer to it, but if you do I hope it helps!
 

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If I buy a "new" knock sensor, how can I test it before actually installing it on the engine? I have a high port engine.
 
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