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cheaper to produce
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doesnt handle as well
 

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G MERA
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This thread and the "P1- vs. P11" thread are a) going to get very long, and very heated, and b) have both been discussed many times in the past. I'm with Greg, try out the search button you'll get plenty of responses.
 

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I can definately tell the difference between the multi-link beam in my I30 vs. the IRS in my old P10. The multi-link beam makes the car respond slightly but noticably to road imperfections more than an IRS-equipped car...I wish Nissan had used an IRS in the A33.
 

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/\/\/\ i like how at the very end the article states that " next year the G20 will most likely have the 190 HP SR20VE " aaahhh how much i drooled reading that statement...
 

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this quote sums it up perfectly, this is really anoying on my P11

"Side-to-side location on beam axles is most commonly done with a Panhard rod--a long link that attaches to the car on one end and the beam on the other. The most obvious problem with this arrangement is that it is asymmetrical. Since the beam is located by a link that swings through an arc, there is a slight side-to-side movement of the beam as the suspension moves up and down. This is not at all good for high-speed stability."
 

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P10 WRC said:
this quote sums it up perfectly, this is really anoying on my P11

"Side-to-side location on beam axles is most commonly done with a Panhard rod--a long link that attaches to the car on one end and the beam on the other. The most obvious problem with this arrangement is that it is asymmetrical. Since the beam is located by a link that swings through an arc, there is a slight side-to-side movement of the beam as the suspension moves up and down. This is not at all good for high-speed stability."
But the P11 doesn't use the panhard rod. Read further...

Both of these problems can be cured by using a more complex Watts linkage, but those are significantly more bulky, and would take up too much trunk space for a luxury sedan like the G20. Instead, the multi-link beam uses what is known as a Scott-Russel approximate straight-line mechanism. This clever arrangement uses two rods to create a link that moves straight up and down. This mechanism requires that one of the attachment points be able to slide, but since this sliding is over a very short distance, Nissan simply designed a special bushing that is extremely soft in the direction the rod must slide, but stiff in any other direction.
 

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"says here on your chart"
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well then my bushings must be shot, because the thing's rear end is not stable on high speed cornering. Anybody know if someone makes solid bushings for the "Scott-Russel approximate straight-line mechanism" links?
 
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