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USPSA M/Pro
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Well, I was selling all my tools to upgrade everything to Craftsman. Now I've got a big Craftsman set on order, and a strong potential buyer for my tools is coming by tomorrow evening. I just finished cleaning up my tools, and man, the memories came flooding in. Welding one of my ratchets to the header when I forgot to undo the battery while working on the starter, working a stuck needle and seat valve on a busy highway onramp with no shoulder, and running to the 24 hour Autozone at 3am to find the crow's foot wrenches to try and get my header gaskets in and having everyone in the store talk Spanish to me just because I looked the part and then me saying "Oh, habla espanol?" and the parts counter guy going "No I don't speak Spanish" and me replying "Well neither do I!" :cheeky:

Is it just me, or is your first set of tools just like your first car? It's true, you don't know what you have till it's gone. I'm feeling it, maybe I should at least keep one of the three wrench sets. They may be ching-chong, but I think it was the first thing I bought after the Nova. That or the ching-chong 3/8" socket and ratchet set.
 

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Not exactly the same but I have a similar story.

My dad passed away a little under a year ago (feels like yesterday) and had a lot of machinist tools that took him a lifetime to collect. Just about everything that one would need for a pro shop. I never really learned how to use what he had; just an applied engineering course (CNC) here and there, so they are not of any real use to me... But I just cannot give them way. Maybe one of these days I will take a course on exactly how to use them.

Tools, cars, homes surely have value as durable goods but sometimes there is an definitely a sentimental value as well.
 

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WCMIII/SR2012 FLAKER
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^^same here

My dad passed way a few years ago, & he had a bunch a tools, most of them tools are older than me, & i'll be 27 in less than two months. Also my brothers & I dont want to part with those tools. A good friend of our dad offered us a good amount of money for those tools, & my brothers & I said thanks, but no thanks & told him of the setimental value those tools have.
 

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Im with you on that, I still have *most* of my origional Craftsman set that I purchased almost 15 years ago. Ive also been collecting tools ever since then as well. Both from a mechanics side and the machinist side, in addition, I inherited my dads entire collection of mechanic and wood working tools so my personal/professional collection is up in the tens of thousands of dollars. Parting with any tool is just out of the question. Ive even gotten to the point where only family can *borrow* tools. If friends need them, they have to use them here at the shop. So yeah, i im pretty sentimental about my tools, its taken me years to get this far.

ZoliElo said:
My dad passed away a little under a year ago (feels like yesterday) and had a lot of machinist tools that took him a lifetime to collect. Just about everything that one would need for a pro shop. I never really learned how to use what he had; just an applied engineering course (CNC) here and there, so they are not of any real use to me... But I just cannot give them way. Maybe one of these days I will take a course on exactly how to use them.
I HIGHLY recomend taking a manual machining course at a vo-tech school or somewhere, you have a small fortune in tools there, I would personally hate to see that go to waste. Similar story, my brothers ex-father in-law was a machinist as well, he passed on many years ago and his entire collection of tools is just sitting there collecting dust. No one in the family has any idea what they are used for and its a shame that someday they will just be tossed out.

If you already have the tools, the only thing you need is time and education to learn how to use them all. A small investment of $20K can easily equip you with decent/great machines to have a nice little machine shop on your hands. Nothing like builing your own parts from scratch. Putting that into perspective, its like buying a car, 5 years to pay off and machine financing is way better than auto financing.

If you ever decide they need a new home to someone that can appreciate them, feel free to hit me up.
 

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I was think a while back that they would have a good home with you Pat but I simply cannot part with them. I am really considering taking a set of community college classes when I can... I am just starting to establish myself as an economist so I need to focus on that for now.

He had a multitude of tools he picked up at local auctions. He was most proud of the vertical mill, lathe, gear shaper and hobbler, grinding machine, and a pneumatic press. He really loved that pneumatic press. He would use the above to make replacement or custom watch and clock parts - mainly as a hobby. I did learn the trade of watch repair but not the true craftsman skill of actual watchmaking. I used to kid around with him saying that back in my physicist days when I had access to CNC gear, I could make anything that he could. He would say that I need a CNC machines...
 
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