Infiniti G20 Nissan Primera Forum banner

1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
484 Posts
Discussion Starter #1
hey all,

so i need to boost the grandparents car... no rush haha.

But my friend said that when doing it... on the dead vehicle you should connect on wire to positive and the other to metal.... not the negative pole of the battery.

is that true??? I have always just connected to pos and neg on each end...

was just interested in knowing :)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
62 Posts
you can do it either way. The battery negative ground attaches to the frame anyway so its basically the same thing.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
It would only go "Kaboom" if there is problem with internal parts of the battery making the cathod touch the anod. (forgive the spelling!). If the battery died since it was sitting around for 4 months then you should not have any "Kaboom" type of deal! What you can do is check the battery with Ohm meter to see if it says 12 volts or so. If it does then either way should be ok. If you get anything less. Take the battery out, take it to autozone and recharge it for free. After all you don't wanna fry the probably already weak alternator for over wroking it nor want the granny come hunt you when she get stranded in the shopping mall.
(There is saying that if you dont want your mama mad, you sure as hell don't want the granny mad.)
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,366 Posts
2000 G-Twenty-T said:
why would you want to boost your grandparents car :p
are they THAT active?
I was thinking the same thing, "boost? they need a turbo?" Or i was thinking gone in 60 seconds style :teeth:
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,469 Posts
pmaadani said:
What you can do is check the battery with Ohm meter to see if it says 12 volts or so. QUOTE]


Uhmm... Ohm meters measure resistance in Ohms, not voltage. Hooking an Ohm meter up to any circuit with current in it will at very least blow a fuse in it, possibly fry the meter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,361 Posts
junknstuff said:
^^uhhhh not true

either battery could go KABOOM if you connect to the negative post. i tend to connect dead car pos>my car pos>my car neg>dead car CHASSIS in that order.

remember to have the car on, otherwise your battery might just drain and you'll have two dead vehicles...
Hason has this right. This is the correct procedure.

pmaadani said:
It would only go "Kaboom" if there is problem with internal parts of the battery making the cathod touch the anod. (forgive the spelling!). If the battery died since it was sitting around for 4 months then you should not have any "Kaboom" type of deal!
No this is really incorrect. The reason that you make the final connection to the dead cars chassis is because you will always get some sort of spark (even just a small one) when you connect any battery. Generally a battery that is discharged will give off quite a bit of hydrogen gas, which if you remember the Hindenburg, is very flammable. So making the connection to the chassis, away from the battery, is a safety measure. Also, sometimes the battery may be discharged because of corroded terminals, and connection to the chassis ensures a good connection to ground which will allow the good battery to start the car.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
462 Posts
If you ever looked at Ohm meter that is made after 1990 you would see it has voltmeter! duh. Also you can check the resistence in the battery to make sure it does not have a internal shortage which cause the "Kabooms". Since most people like Xnote are ignorant as how to check a battery internal resistence with ohm meter, therefore manufacture avoid liability by telling you to do it in different way. Also just becasue you do not see a spark when you connect the battery as Jacob suggest it does not mean anything. A little spark at battery does not hurt anything. Anytime, you start your car, you provide more shock to your electric system than connecting a battery cables when ignition is closed! But once again, car makers have to cover their rear end from dummies who manage to try to jump a battery that has internal damage and end up hurting themselves!
Feel free to go find the expert opinions in cases of dummies who got hurt and sued the battery makers.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,361 Posts
PJ

I think you missed my point. I was not talking about testing the battery. Only that there is hydrogen gas present in and immediately around a discharged battery. That is one of the primary reasons you connect the ground away from the battery to the chassis.
I agree that you would use a volt meter to test the condition of the battery as you described.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,469 Posts
pmaadani said:
If you ever looked at Ohm meter that is made after 1990 you would see it has voltmeter! duh. Also you can check the resistence in the battery to make sure it does not have a internal shortage which cause the "Kabooms". Since most people like Xnote are ignorant as how to check a battery internal resistence with ohm meter, therefore manufacture avoid liability by telling you to do it in different way.QUOTE]

I guess you're refering to a multimeter then, not an ohm meter. A multimeter set to one of the voltmeter settings is not an ohm meter. It is, at that point, a voltmeter. duh. And for the rest of us "ignorant" people, please enlighten me with your vast knowledge of how to test the resistance of a battery (or any other circuit with power in it) without frying an ohm meter.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
8,918 Posts
Ignorance = aruguing on the internet.
It was obvious to me and probably many others what he meant, ohm meter, volt meter, fluke, whatever. Anybody who has used one has a clue what he meant. :rolleyes:
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
Top